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  • Asian Business Association Opposes SB 1000

    Today’s Asian Journal highlights an opinion piece by Dennis Huang, Executive Director and CEO of the Asian Business Association, that describes the negative impact Senate Bill 1000 would have on hundreds of products, including popular drinks imported and sold by thousands of Asian American business owners and entrepreneurs in California.

    “It is the unintended consequences of SB 1000 that should have Asian business owners concerned – particularly those businesses that sell imported beverages like Ramune soda and certain fruit beverages like mango and coconut drinks, which contain sugar. Those products, even though they are not produced in California, would require warning labels on the cans and bottles in order to be sold in California.

     It’s not clear if the elected officials in Sacramento considered this fact before writing the bill or if any of them had consulted the Asian business community to avoid this type of unintended consequences.

    Government mandates to put warning labels on our beverages will do nothing to decrease obesity in California or teach people about healthy lifestyles. Rather, the labels will be costly to business and expose many restaurants and grocers to civil penalties.”

    Read the piece in its entirety here.

  • Asian Business Association Opposes SB 1000

    Today’s Asian Journal highlights an opinion piece by Dennis Huang, Executive Director and CEO of the Asian Business Association, that describes the negative impact Senate Bill 1000 would have on hundreds of products, including popular drinks imported and sold by thousands of Asian American business owners and entrepreneurs in California.

    “It is the unintended consequences of SB 1000 that should have Asian business owners concerned – particularly those businesses that sell imported beverages like Ramune soda and certain fruit beverages like mango and coconut drinks, which contain sugar. Those products, even though they are not produced in California, would require warning labels on the cans and bottles in order to be sold in California.

     It’s not clear if the elected officials in Sacramento considered this fact before writing the bill or if any of them had consulted the Asian business community to avoid this type of unintended consequences.

    Government mandates to put warning labels on our beverages will do nothing to decrease obesity in California or teach people about healthy lifestyles. Rather, the labels will be costly to business and expose many restaurants and grocers to civil penalties.”

    Read the piece in its entirety here.

  • New Illinois Soda Tax Won’t Make a Dent in Obesity

    Today’s The Southern Editorial calls for the disposing of the potential soda-tax plan for Illinois, which simply serves as an ill-fitting bandaid for "a state with a long-standing and severe problem of overspending." 

    Recognizing the seriousness of the widespread national obesity problem, “…one with an increasing total of preventable deaths and a medical price tag that may someday surpass our ability to pay. Obviously, something must be done about the public health crisis of obesity. But it should not include…misguided legislation."

    The Southern points out a key flaw in the new legislation: "By itself, the new tax won’t make a significant dent in obesity. Sugar-sweetened beverages are not the only factor in excessive weight, just the newest target on a nutritional shooting range littered with earlier target – fast foods, alcoholic beverages, fried foods, candy, fatty foods, foods that are high in carbohydrates and just plain junk food."

    Indeed, we wholehearted echo the editorial’s common sense conclusion “…it is not the function of state government to police our appetites and place unreasonable burdens on the few frills that are within the reach of average working men and women.” 

    Read more from the Voice of The Southern: Time to dispose soft-drink tax plan here.

  • Warning Labels Won’t Solve Anything

    Today’s Monterey Herald Editorial exposes the common sense truth behind why slapping a warning label on thousands of sugar-sweetened products across California (here’s a complete list) isn't the silver bullet to health awareness and improvement. As the Herald astutely notes, "Legislators can easily fixate on passing new laws. Putting another law on the books isn't always the best solution. A warning label on sweet drinks won't solve the problem. Education and better public awareness on many fronts might.”

    We agree that education and public awareness is the key to improving public health, however, the issue with this measure is that it will not change consumer behavior as a result. The Herald also notes, "Childhood obesity is an issue far more complicated than slapping warning labels on soda cans. Obesity stems from a wide variety of issues — from diet to exercise as well as other lifestyle choices."

    In fact, we couldn't have said it better ourselves - “…instead of relying on simple solutions like warning labels, our elected officials would be better off working with educators, non-profits and even large food and beverage corporations to raise awareness of healthy practices — not just diet choices, but exercise as well.” 

    Read more from The Monterey County Herald here.

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