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THE RESEARCH IS CLEAR

Soda taxes are ineffective at combating obesity and damaging to local businesses. Check out the research that shaped the movie right here.

 
“In 1914, following a decline in important tariffs, President Woodrow Wilson proposed a special excise tax on soft drinks.”

Source: Wilson Proposes Soft Drink Tax (Hawaiian Gazette, 9/1/1914)
 

“Three U.S. states with some of the highest obesity rates – Tennessee, West Virginia, and Arkansas—all have some form of soda tax in place.”

Source 1: Mississippians Most Obese, Montanans Least Obese (Gallup, 3/4/2014)
Source 2: Taxes on Soft Drinks or Candy (OLR Research Report)
Source 3: State with the Highest Obesity Rates (Accessed 01/13/2015)
 

“…Denmark has had a soda tax on the books since the 1930s. Though the country recently repealed it.”

Source: Denmark to scrap decades-old soft drink tax, (Food Navigator, 4/25/2013)
 

“…Voters in Berkeley approved Measure D, a penny per-ounce tax on sugar-sweetened beverages.”

Source: Nation’s First Soda Tax Passed in California City (Time, 11/5/2014)
 

“While a penny-per-ounce doesn’t sound like much, it can add up to a price increase of almost 200 percent for a two-liter bottle of soda.”

Source: Berkeley Measure D Costs & Facts (advertisement appearing in Contra Costa Times, 11/1/2014)
 

“This is not just a tax on soda. Hundreds of beverages are impacted by this tax.”

Source: Berkeley City Ordinance – Imposing a General Tax on the Distribution of Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Products
 

“Rather than tax consumers directly for their soda purchases…it is left to the discretion of the shop owner.”

Source: Berkeley City Ordinance – Imposing a General Tax on the Distribution of Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Products
 

“Elected officials here promised that tax revenue would also benefit clean drinking water initiatives in public schools across the country.”

Source: Mexico enacts soda tax in effort to combat world’s highest obesity rate (The Guardian, 1/16/2014)
 

“Enacted in 2013, this tax increases the price of sugar-sweetened products by about fifteen percent…”

Source: ANPRAC “Effects of the IEPS on Flavored Beverages” Slide 1 (Link to PDF)
 

“The sale of sodas and other sugar-sweetened beverages is down by a little over two percent…”

Source: Nielsen
 

"The sale of health and beauty products also went down by two percent.”

Source: Kantar WorldPanel, New Taxes Realign Mexican Household Expenses (Link to PDF)
 

“Following the implementation of the 2013 tax package – more than twenty-five thousand neighborhood stores were forced to shut their doors…near the Guatemala border where poverty and crime is already rampant.”

Source: ANPEC Press Release, “Economic policies led to the closure of “neighborhood stores” and place small shopkeepers in survival mode” (Link to PDF)